Why Breaking Away from the Norms Would Make You a Better Manager

first break all the rules what the worlds greatest managers do differently
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There are lots of talented people at work. Lucky is the manager who has found this kind of team members.

The thing with talented people, they can come, but they can also go.

This is one of the things a manager should truly think about – how to retain those members in the team. They are an asset and worth keeping.

So, what does a manager do?

Asking the Right Questions

For an organization to attract and keep their employees, they must take into consideration where their organization is at.

These questions are prepared to check just that. This is not exactly a method to retain but to check how the company stands in terms of recruiting and keeping the employees.

Here we go:

Have they explained and communicated the work expectations  to me?

Are we provided the resources to do our work properly?

Am I given the chance at work to do my best?

Within the past week, did I receive recognition for a job well done?

Does anyone at work care for me personally?

Do they encourage me at work to do my best?

Do they listen to what I have to say, when I have an opinion to share?

Am I aware of the vision and mission of the company and how my role contributes to it?

Are all of the members in my team driven to deliver the best performance?

Do I have a close work buddy?

Within the past six months, has someone discussed with me my performance?

Am I given the opportunity to grow within the company?

If we study these questions, it would give us an idea how we should be attracting and keeping your team members. These questions can guide you in building a system or strategy to make employees feel that it’s worth entering and staying in the company.

Getting There – Leaping Through the Hurdles

We now have the questions, let’s get to the answers. Let’s address the questions by parts so we can get to a strategy easier.

Have they explained and communicated the work expectations to me?

Are we provided the resources to do our work properly?

With these questions, you have to list the work expectations and know what they need to do the job. How much will they be paid for the role? What role will they play.

What resources will be made available to them – a desk, computer, and so on. This is essentially the first phase, how is it to be a part of the team.

Then we go to the next set of questions:

Am I given the chance at work to do my best?

Within the past week, did I receive recognition for a job well done?

Does anyone at work care for me personally?

Do they encourage me at work to do my best?

It’s about, when they are doing the role already. Are they given equal opportunities to shoe their best everyday? And praised for that matter?

Are they encouraged to do better even? And in a personal level, do they feel they matter? This is the stage where they are settling in already, and how their work is perceived.

With that, we move on to the next:

Do they listen to what I have to say, when I have an opinion to share?

Am I aware of the vision and mission of the company and how my role contributes to it?

Are all the members in my team driven to deliver the best performance?

Do I have a close work buddy?

This set of questions focus not only on the individual employee but also the rest of the team. Can these individuals work well together to achieve the goal? Will there we good teamwork?

Finally, we move on to the last two questions:

Within the past six months, has someone discussed with me my performance?

Am I given the opportunity to grow within the company?

These last two questions culminate all phases. It’s about the employee being able to feel that he has achieved something within the company. It’s also about their satisfaction and growth.

Choosing

What are the manager’s usual criteria in choosing team members? What type of people do they recruit? This is a crucial point in setting what kind of people you want for the team.

While others may put intelligence, persistence, and a wealth of experience as their criteria – is it really all wise to depend on such?

How about looking at talent? Skills can be learned over time. Knowledge can be transferred. Talent is something the person really has within. People have different talents.

Talents which are driven by three types of questions. There is the one that is the “why” type, why they do what they do. The other type is the “who”, who they like to work with. And the last one, the “how” type – how they do things.

Knowing the types of talent, you can match them with the roles in the team. If you are looking for someone driven? The “why” type fits the job.

If the job demands logic and rationalization –then look for the “how” talent. Lastly, if the role entails communicating and such the “who” type is perfect for that.

The talents comprise the entire organization so picture how they all fit into the picture. Is the organization aligned? Are there any gaps?

Truth be told, it’s not easy spotting talent. The key in choosing by talent is structuring the selection and interview process. What are the main indications of the why, who, and how type of talents? Knowing that may lead you to focus during the selection process.

Defining Success

Some managers may be too focused on communicating the steps in reaching the goal. However. Some managers can focus in defining what the results should be.

This way, it gives the team members more accountability as they have more options and freedom in their journey to success.

However, this should still be under some certain conditions. With privilege comes with certain responsibilities.

  • Safety and Accuracy Measures – The team should still be bound by these measures. No risk is worth it if they are not following guidelines that ensure their safety and lead to result accuracy.
  • Company/Industry Standards – They should understand that there are still standards to follow and they should be within it.
  • Standard Versus Result – There can be quite an obsession to follow steps and the goal is sometimes lost along the way. This shouldn’t be the case. The system shouldn’t be an obstacle in getting results.
  • Customer Satisfaction – Guidelines are often present to prevent unhappy customers. So there’s no perfect recipe or exact measures to win customer satisfaction. Focusing on the guidelines does not guarantee a one, happy customer.

Focus on Strength

One common mistake is looking for a person’s weakness and finding ways to correct it. This shouldn’t be the case. Each person has their own set of strengths and weaknesses.

Why focus on the weaknesses? Why are you looking for solutions to augment the weakness when you can focus on the strengths instead?

That’s what great managers do. They work around the weaknesses and highlight the strengths of the members and focus on it.

Great managers recognize each member’s strength and work on it and how it can contribute to the organization.

The manager should understand that not all individuals are the same. Different capabilities, different strengths in different areas. Managers who recognizes these strengths, sits down with their members and guides them through this.

They talk about what the employee can do well. The manager won’t focus on what the member can’t do or their weaknesses, the focus is their strength.

Finding the Right Role

When the members are all settled in, there will be a time when they will ask what’s next for them? Some managers would think that promotion is the next step. However, is it really what is right for the concerned individual?

For some, promotion would be the answer for movement within the organization. Great managers have other things in mind for their members. It’s about finding the right role for the team member.

Promotion is not always the answer for movement. Great managers think about where the individual can flourish best. What pathway is best for the person. It’s helping the person find the right fit within the company.

So there you go! Great managers don’t usually do what is expected of them, they breakaway from the notions and do way better for the team. It’s just about focusing what’s better for everyone and not being held up by previous managing myths.

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